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  • LakerTom (Publisher) 2:28 PM on July 30, 2014 Permalink | Log in to leave a Comment  

    Could Eric Bledsoe actually sign his qualifying offer? 

    BY SAM VECENIE FOR FANSIDED

    Eric Bledsoe is not happy.

    Information is leaking from his camp like it’s a faulty faucet, and none of it is good for either party. First, he was angry at the NBA’s collective bargaining agreement. The most recent development, as reported by Chris Haynes of CSNW, is that the Suns-Bledsoe relationship is “on the express lane towards being ruined.”

    According to league sources, an “ominous development” has arisen with sides still “very far apart” in contract negotiations. It has even escalated to the point where the “relationship is on the express lane to being ruined,” a source with knowledge of the situation informed CSNNW.com.

    The Suns offered Bledsoe a four-year, $48 million deal with declining salaries each year, two sources said. That proposal was quickly turned down. Bledsoe’s camp is putting a max price tag on the player Suns Head Coach Jeff Hornacek called “a Top-10 player in the NBA in coming years”, another source said.

    So that doesn’t look good. The four-year, $48 million offer is probably a pretty fair one for Bledsoe, considering past and current point guard negotiations. Stephen Curry got four years, $44 million from Golden State after a similarly injury-laden first three seasons. Ty Lawson got four years, $48 million from Denver after a similarly strong first three years. Mike Conley got five years, $45 million from Memphis after a middling first three seasons. And of course, Kyle Lowry got four years, $48 million this year from Toronto after hitting the open market during what was a near All-Star campaign.

    Four years, $40-50 million seems to be the going rate for borderline all-star point guards, so it makes sense why the Suns would believe this is a fair deal to offer. Getting a talent like Bledsoe under contract for four years at a reasonable rate has worked out for each of the previously mentioned teams, so that’s their best case scenario at this point. Even with the injury risk that Bledsoe has presented in the past, it makes sense to roll the dice here. When he’s on the floor, he’s a two-way dynamo that is rapidly improving with every passing moment.

    However, let’s try to take a look at the negotiations from Bledsoe’s perspective. Could it make monetary sense for him to sign a qualifying offer then hit the free agency market? Would he be better off signing this deal? Does he actually have the ability to go out and sign a shorter-term deal somewhere else?

    I’ve laid out the three options for Bledsoe in the chart below. Before we get there, I’ve explained them:

    1. Accepting a long-term deal for the Suns. I’ve upped the numbers to 4 years, $52 million in order to account for negotiation leeway. This seems like a fair amount, given that Bledsoe is on the market and only one of the previously mentioned point guards ever got that far. Also, I’ve given flat salaries across the years as well.
    2. Accepting the qualifying offer at $3.726 million. This would allow Bledsoe to become an unrestricted free agent next offseason and pursue the max he so desires. I’ve been generous and estimated that he plays well this season and finds the five year, $80 million deal he’s looking for now.
    3. Going out and finding a team willing to offer him a shorter term, higher salary deal so that he can hit free agency faster and get out of Phoenix immediately. While Phoenix would potentially match this offer anyway, it could end up being a good scenario for Bledsoe to get out faster, while still signing for big money. Teams that could offer this include Atlanta, Milwaukee, Orlando and Philadelphia. I’ve estimated it at two years, $28 million, which would then allow him to go out and get a max contract after if he plays well.
    Year/Option
    Long Term with Suns
    Qualifying Offer
    Short term deal somewhere else
    1 $13,000,000 $3,726,966 $14,000,000
    2 $13,000,000 $14,746,000 $14,000,000
    3 $13,000,000 $15,851,950 $14,746,000
    4 $13,000,000 $16,957,900 $15,851,950
    Total $52,000,000 $51,282,816 $58,597,950

    First and foremost, I should note that the maximum contract as defined by the CBA for the first six years that someone is in the league is 25 percent of the salary cap. Given that the salary cap may rise in the coming years, the salary estimates here on future earnings are slightly off. I’ve used a 2014 max contract as an example.

    The biggest thing that this table shows is that signing a qualifying offer does not make monetary sense for Bledsoe. The salary that he would lose out on this year would not be made up until potentially the fifth season of this deal. However, by that point, Bledsoe would be eligible for the maximum contract given to 7-9 year veterans, which is worth 30% of the cap and started at $17,695,200 this season. So it’s entirely possible that he would never actually make up the money that he lost by signing the qualifying offer. This, along with the inherent injury risk that Bledsoe has shown to be over the first four seasons of his career, should not be an option for their camp.

    However, it might make the most sense for Bledsoe to go out and find another offer. There is also inherent risk in this deal, in that he’d only be guaranteeing himself half of what the Suns have offered him at this point. That’s not a small factor here. However, if he could sign this deal, perform well for, say, Atlanta (who I actually think this represents a tremendous opportunity for), and then hit the open market in two seasons, he could brace himself for an even larger future pay day.

    It’s worth noting that a three-year deal is Bledsoe’s absolute dream scenario here. It would allow him to accrue enough service time to be eligible for the 30% of the cap maximum deal when he hits the open market, and would lessen his stint with the Suns by a season. Obviously, the Suns would not be fans of that deal, and they hold the leverage until he agrees with another team. However, that could be another way for a team to entice Bledsoe to sign with them, or even a reasonable negotiation accommodation by the Suns to make Bledsoe happy. Some precedent for this was set in the Lance Stephenson deal this offseason, although Stephenson was an unrestricted free agent.

    Overall, signing the short term deal probably makes the most sense for Bledsoe’s camp in order to maximize salary in the future, slightly minimize injury risk, and potentially regain leverage in the negotiations.

    http://upsidemotor.com/2014/07/30/eric-bledsoe-contract-qualifying-offer/

     
    • LakerTom (Publisher) 2:36 PM on July 30, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Rooting for Eric to accept the qualifying offer, tear the league up this year, and join the Lakers next year.

    • MongoSlade (Director)

      MongoSlade (Director) 3:43 PM on July 30, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      The 3rd option is unrealistic.
      If he signed a 2 year offer sheet, the Suns would match it before the ink dried.

      I’d like to see him sign the QO but then again I love to see chaos and bedlam..lol
      That would turn some things topsy turvy.
      But with his injury history it presents a huge risk.

  • Magicman (Editor)

    Magicman (Editor) 1:15 PM on July 30, 2014 Permalink | Log in to leave a Comment  

     
    • Magicman (Editor)

      Magicman (Editor) 1:17 PM on July 30, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Injuries are a big, big issue here, alright and Bledsoe and his peeps just have to deal with the News.

      Steph Curry signed a 4 year/44 Million dollar deal. Now it’s looks like a bargain, but was it really? Steph’s had ankle issues since High School.

      The Warriors present and future are dependent on the fragility of two ankles. Curry realized, he’d have to take a hit on his first extension, if he stays healthy, there’s no question he’ll get close or maxed out.

      Bledsoe needs to think about his future as much as he’s thinking about his present.

      • Magicman (Editor)

        Magicman (Editor) 1:19 PM on July 30, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

        Steph has Achilles’ ankles. “Tissue-paper ankles,” as I’ve often called them on “First Take.” Twice he has had ankle surgery, once to repair ligaments and once to clean out loose bodies. He has turned or tweaked his ankles countless times, sometimes while just dribbling half-speed. He has missed 54 games over four NBA seasons and has winced though many more.

        http://espn.go.com/nba/story/_/id/9273221/stephen-curry-bad-ankles

  • Magicman (Editor)

    Magicman (Editor) 1:13 PM on July 30, 2014 Permalink | Log in to leave a Comment  

     
  • Magicman (Editor)

    Magicman (Editor) 1:09 PM on July 30, 2014 Permalink | Log in to leave a Comment  

     
  • MongoSlade (Director)

    MongoSlade (Director) 1:02 PM on July 30, 2014 Permalink | Log in to leave a Comment  

     
    • DJ2KB24

      DJ2KB24 1:17 PM on July 30, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      If ya pick up Beasley, you best start him, he doesn’t seem to do any team well off the bench. Otherwise, pass on him.

      • Magicman (Editor)

        Magicman (Editor) 1:26 PM on July 30, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

        Seems like he’d be good for any team right now.

        Since he’s gotten off the Pot, his focus is on point.

        • mclyne32 (Director) 1:44 PM on July 30, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

          Well, the thing I would worry about is: if things to start going poorly for him, would he dive back deep into the sticky green?

    • LakerTom (Publisher) 2:31 PM on July 30, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Mitch has always had his eye on Beaseley, just like he did on Hill and Lin.
      We could use another small forward. I would prefer Marion but would take Beaseley.

  • MongoSlade (Director)

    MongoSlade (Director) 12:56 PM on July 30, 2014 Permalink | Log in to leave a Comment  

     
    • Magicman (Editor)

      Magicman (Editor) 1:00 PM on July 30, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Any kind of Nepotism will be up for debate for sure.

      I get the feeling Byron’s safety net is stronger than D’Antoni’s but It’s about Wins and Losses at the end of the day.

      Rambis didn’t get off the hook, neither did Earvin when he coached.

      • Jamie Sweet (Local Ne'er-Do-Well)

        Jamie Sweet (Local Ne'er-Do-Well) 1:29 PM on July 30, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

        Criticism comes with the job but the heat on D’Antoni was that he hewed to a system to the point of insanity. Lacked the personnel to run the RTSMDS, effectively, threw players under the bus, benched some of his better guys because…who knows but the losses just kept coming.

        Heck, Phil won 5 rings here and people still act like he was fool who somehow lucked his way into 11 championships. No, I think the criticism will be in full effect, but the “like” factor with Byron is a lot higher. Mike trashing the team in his book didn’t ever go over well with the fans and seeing his favored son Nash sitting there soaking up salary cap while not playing all fed into it.

  • Magicman (Editor)

    Magicman (Editor) 12:52 PM on July 30, 2014 Permalink | Log in to leave a Comment  

     
  • Magicman (Editor)

    Magicman (Editor) 12:33 PM on July 30, 2014 Permalink | Log in to leave a Comment  

     
    • Magicman (Editor)

      Magicman (Editor) 12:51 PM on July 30, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Jeff Schwartz’ phone is probably ringing off the hook right now.

  • Jamie Sweet (Local Ne'er-Do-Well)

    Jamie Sweet (Local Ne'er-Do-Well) 11:35 AM on July 30, 2014 Permalink | Log in to leave a Comment  

    The Byron Scott Era 

    Well it’s finally here.  Purportedly years in the making, according to the esteemed and honorable Magic Johnson, Byron Scott has ascended to the position the late Dr. Buss seemingly dreamed he always would: Laker Head Coach.  Byron started his tenure as head coach with a surprise visit from a cadre of Laker Legends certifying that this hire was as grounded in the past as much as having an eye towards the future.  Getting the likes of Magic, Kareem and other Lakers of Old onboard is a solid PR move by the team and one centered around the idea of plugging all the leaky holes on a ship that had settled too low in the water.

    The future of the team is still centered around Kobe Bryant, at least for two more seasons, possibly more.  Nobody knows for certain.  With that in mind the Lakers did a great job finding a coach to match their super stars’ mentality.  Byron and Kobe have been buddies since Kobe’s rookie season (as I’m sure most of us know by now) but even more importantly Byron’s teams have always put the onus on controlling pace through quality offensive possessions.  This is, obviously, the opposite of the D’Antoni Mantra of push it and shoot it, a style that didn’t make the most out of Kobe’s skill set and other Lakers, now since departed.

    Byron likes to run a hybrid Princeton offense (4 players on the perimeter based around a deft post passer) which didn’t work out so well under Mike Brown.  However, it should be noted that Byron has been using variations of this offense since his time in New Jersey when he took the Nets to the NBA Finals.  So, unlike Mike Brown who was learning it all on the fly along with the team, Byron already is versed in how to distill the message to players in a way they can comprehend and easily implement.

    Scott’s calling card as a coach is improving the team’s focus on the defensive end.  While he was less successful in Cleveland than he was anywhere else it should be noted that he was coaching a newly formed core of younger players and his best defender, Anderson Varejao, was often injured for long stretches at a time.  Looking at the Laker roster one isn’t exactly flattened at the number of quality defenders but if Byron can at least get the team on same page I think we’ll see an uptick in play on that end of the court.  It’s hard to envision the team performing worse on defense than we did last year when the perimeter D was a joke and the interior D was overwhelmed by guys getting a free pass to the rack.

    Outside of people who are big time Laker fans, this hire won’t knock anyone’s socks off; some might even say that he was the obvious choice in some regards (cozy Kobe relationship, Laker Legend, defensive minded without being overly focused on that end, looks to control the pace which is essential for a veteran squad).  But as a Big Time Laker Fan I think that this is one of the better coaches we could choose.  It could be argued that, by waiting so long, we missed out on re-signing some players better suited to run this type of offensive system (Jodie Meeks and Pau Gasol come to mind) but in the end those players were likely going to leave no matter what, either for money or personal reasons.

    The team’s cap situation has largely been resolved.  Next season Nash comes off the books and we’ll re-evaluate our wealth of single season contracts, possibly pick up the option on Jordan Hill and look to sign a big time free agent.  Cracking the playoff ceiling and getting into that 8 seed will require at least a 20 game improvement, possibly more in the Western Conference, and there’s no guarantee this team can accomplish that.  But, if we show signs of defensive consistency, Kobe shows he can still ball at a Kobe-esque level and the role players improve we’ll be a lot more attractive to a super star than we were this year.  The future may not be as bright as we wish it could be, but it certainly isn’t as dim as it was last season.

    Welcome back, Mr. Byron Scott, best of luck and GO LAKERS!!!!!

     
    • Magicman (Editor)

      Magicman (Editor) 11:54 AM on July 30, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Nice write-up Jamie.

      Yeah, that Cleveland team was young and the youth rebelled against the old in that case.

      I’ve found his Nets and Hornets teams, while having a couple great individual defenders, his teams played solid team defense with a philosophy on 24 seconds with maximum effort.

      I’ve seen him take out Irving, James Posey, Kenyon Martin, for not playing for 24 seconds.

      He’ll get the best out of this roster defensively though, you can bank on that.

      • Jamie Sweet (Local Ne'er-Do-Well)

        Jamie Sweet (Local Ne'er-Do-Well) 12:05 PM on July 30, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

        Cleveland was a disaster from the moment the ink dried: Lebron left, bad mix of young and old (with the old being the better defenders), injuries like we sustained last season.

        • Magicman (Editor)

          Magicman (Editor) 12:07 PM on July 30, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

          And Kyrie’s defense.

          Lebron Love and Irving would be a marvelous offensive team.

          But an unmitigated disaster defensively. Lebron’s a great help defender, but even he can’t be in two places at once. :)

          • Jamie Sweet (Local Ne'er-Do-Well)

            Jamie Sweet (Local Ne'er-Do-Well) 12:09 PM on July 30, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

            His defensive rep stems from chase down highlight reel blocks, which are cool, but he’s no lock down defender. Has he ever been named to the defensive team in the NBA? Not sure…

            But yeah, adding K-Love to that mix seems like building a merry go round between a bank and a prison and opening the doors to both.

    • LakerTom (Publisher) 2:35 PM on July 30, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Good stuff as usual, Jamie. I think fans forget that the success of coaches like Byron have been more dependent upon the players he has to work with than his own coaching chops. Like D’Antoni, with the right players, Scott was an NBA coach of the year. I’m hoping Byron will rise to the challenge and get this team to overachieve and create some momentum toward building a championship roster and mentality. I see four factors that tell me we will be dramatically better than last year: health, hunger, talent, and continuity.

  • Magicman (Editor)

    Magicman (Editor) 11:19 AM on July 30, 2014 Permalink | Log in to leave a Comment  

     
  • Magicman (Editor)

    Magicman (Editor) 11:12 AM on July 30, 2014 Permalink | Log in to leave a Comment  

     
    • Magicman (Editor)

      Magicman (Editor) 11:12 AM on July 30, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Never thought I’d find someone I thought was funnier than Richard Pryor and Carlin, who were at the top of my list.

      Then I heard Robin Harris. :)

      • Magicman (Editor)

        Magicman (Editor) 11:27 AM on July 30, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

        Sweet d**k Willy in Do The Right Thing.

        • Magicman (Editor)

          Magicman (Editor) 11:31 AM on July 30, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

          • Magicman (Editor)

            Magicman (Editor) 11:32 AM on July 30, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

            “If Mike Tyson dream about whoopin’ my a*s, he better wake up and apologize.’

        • AK27

          AK27 3:02 PM on July 30, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

          I had never heard of him until this morning, Sean..friggin’ hilarious !

          Oh and…Burrell from The Wire :)

    • MongoSlade (Director)

      MongoSlade (Director) 11:32 AM on July 30, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      We used to catch him at the old Comedy Act Theatre back in the day.
      Dude was a genius who left us too soon.

      • Magicman (Editor)

        Magicman (Editor) 11:36 AM on July 30, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

        Man, he went in on Tiny Lister, I lost my s**t Mongo. That was real!!

      • MongoSlade (Director)

        MongoSlade (Director) 11:43 AM on July 30, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

        The stuff on film doesn’t even compare to the real thing.
        He was like the black Don Rickles when he would get on folks in the audience.

  • Magicman (Editor)

    Magicman (Editor) 11:10 AM on July 30, 2014 Permalink | Log in to leave a Comment  

     
  • Magicman (Editor)

    Magicman (Editor) 11:04 AM on July 30, 2014 Permalink | Log in to leave a Comment  

     
    • Magicman (Editor)

      Magicman (Editor) 11:05 AM on July 30, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Borderline right now, I know Byron will have the team hustling and bustling.

      The Lakers need to make a move during the season to get a specialist, doesn’t matter if it’s offensive or defensive, to help increase the win total in order to make the playoffs.

    • MongoSlade (Director)

      MongoSlade (Director) 11:20 AM on July 30, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      The question is which team in the west are they going to replace?
      Bottom 4 seeds were POR, GSW, DAL, MEM.

    • NBA4ever

      NBA4ever 1:53 PM on July 30, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Don’t forget about the Suns and possibly Wolves . This team isn’t making the playoffs

  • Magicman (Editor)

    Magicman (Editor) 10:59 AM on July 30, 2014 Permalink | Log in to leave a Comment  

     
  • Magicman (Editor)

    Magicman (Editor) 10:57 AM on July 30, 2014 Permalink | Log in to leave a Comment  

     
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